Beasts of Bristol
Beasts of Bristol

1 Corn Street
2 Corn Street
3 Corn Street
4 Corn Street
5 Queen Square
6 Corn Street
7 Broad Street
8 Corn Street

Buy from:
The Bristol Shop

A selection of the quirkiest stone carvings of animals on buildings in Corn Street and the principal streets in the historic centre of Bristol.

These largely escaped destruction during the Bristol Blitz, and a number of historic buildings survive:

The Exchange, built in 1741-43 as a corn and trade exchange
The Old Post Office, built in 1746
The Commercial Rooms, built in 1810 as coffee rooms for merchants
The Old Council House, built in 1824-27
53 & 55 Corn Street built in 1854-58 for the West of England Bank
St Nicholas Market inside The Exchange.

29 Queen Square is one of the few surviving original houses in Queen Square, which was laid out in 1699. Frontage styles varied and No 29 was fairly fancy, suited to its wealthy first owner, the alderman Nathanial Day, later Bristol’s mayor. The entrance gates are carved vertically with an animal and decorative frieze and the windows are liberally decorated with grotesque keys.

A3 poster printed on a smooth, heavyweight, 100% cotton matt archival art paper with a faint raised texture. Size A3, 30cm width x 42cm height which fits a standard A3 frame or an A2 frame with an A3 mount. Sold unframed and posted flat.

Ref: BRIS 59

Buy online:

 
Items added to basket
Beasts of Bristol

1 Corn Street
2 Corn Street
3 Corn Street
4 Corn Street
5 Queen Square
6 Corn Street
7 Broad Street
8 Corn Street

Buy from:
The Bristol Shop

A selection of the quirkiest stone carvings of animals on buildings in Corn Street and the principal streets in the historic centre of Bristol.

These largely escaped destruction during the Bristol Blitz, and a number of historic buildings survive:

The Exchange, built in 1741-43 as a corn and trade exchange
The Old Post Office, built in 1746
The Commercial Rooms, built in 1810 as coffee rooms for merchants
The Old Council House, built in 1824-27
53 & 55 Corn Street built in 1854-58 for the West of England Bank
St Nicholas Market inside The Exchange.

29 Queen Square is one of the few surviving original houses in Queen Square, which was laid out in 1699. Frontage styles varied and No 29 was fairly fancy, suited to its wealthy first owner, the alderman Nathanial Day, later Bristol’s mayor. The entrance gates are carved vertically with an animal and decorative frieze and the windows are liberally decorated with grotesque keys.

A3 poster printed on a smooth, heavyweight, 100% cotton matt archival art paper with a faint raised texture. Size A3, 30cm width x 42cm height which fits a standard A3 frame or an A2 frame with an A3 mount. Sold unframed and posted flat.

Ref: BRIS 59

Buy online:

 
Items added to basket